Adventures of a Young Naturalist

February 9, 2019

 

“A GREAT BOOK.” —THE NEW YORK TIMES
 
“MARVELOUS.” —THE TELEGRAPH
 
“A RARE GLIMPSE OF A FLEDGLING DAVID ATTENBOROUGH IN THE WILD.” —VANITY FAIR
 
Living legend and presenter of BBC’s Planet Earth series Sir David Attenborough tells the story of his early career as a broadcaster and a naturalist in his own words.

In 1954, David Attenborough, a young television presenter, was offered the opportunity of a lifetime–to travel the world finding rare and elusive animals for the London Zoo’s collection, and to film the expedition for the BBC for a new show called Zoo Quest.

This is the story of those voyages. Staying with local tribes while trekking in search of giant anteaters in Guyana, Komodo dragons in Indonesia, and armadillos in Paraguay, he and the rest of the team contended with cannibal fish, aggressive tree porcupines, and escape-artist wild pigs, as well as treacherous terrain and unpredictable weather, to record the incredible beauty and biodiversity of these regions.

Written with his trademark wit and charm, Adventures of a Young Naturalist is not just the story of a remarkable adventure, but of the man who made us fall in love with the natural world and taught us the importance of protecting it–and who is still doing so today.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sir David Attenborough is Britain’s best-known natural history film-maker. His career as a naturalist and broadcaster has spanned nearly six decades.

His first job – after Cambridge University and two years in the Royal Navy – was at a London publishing house. Then in 1952 he joined the BBC as a trainee producer, and it was while working on the Zoo Quest series (1954-64) that he had his first opportunity to undertake expeditions to remote parts of the globe, to capture intimate footage of rare wildlife in its natural habitat.

He was Controller of BBC2 (1965-68), during which time he introduced colour television to Britain, then Director of Programmes for the BBC (1969-1972). However, in 1973 he abandoned administration altogether to return to documentary-making and writing, and has established himself as the world’s leading Natural History programme maker with several landmark BBC series, including Life on Earth (1979), The Living Planet (1984), The Trials of Life (1990), The Private Life of Plants (1995), Life of Birds (1998), The Blue Planet (2001), Life of Mammals (2002), Planet Earth (2006) and Life in Cold Blood (2008).

Sir David was knighted in 1985, is an Honorary Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge, and a Fellow of the Royal Society, and stands at the forefront of issues concerning the planet’s declining species and conservation

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